What is, and is not, crowdfunding

One of the challenges of crowdfunding is explaining what it is, and what it isn’t. Plenty of people get the general idea, but stumble when thinking about how it might work or which types of businesses might benefit from mass micro-investments.

Crowdfunding is not a group of gray-haired, starched-shirt guys sitting around a mahogany table saying things like, “James, this wind farm plan sounds like a splendid idea. Just splendid.” If it requires multi-millions of cap ex, needs rich stiffs to finance it, or displays some perfectly coherent investment thesis, then it might be suitable for  venture capital, banks, etc.

Crowdfunding resembles something like a bunch dreamers, tradesmen, enthusiasts, and real-estate savvy types sitting around coffee when one says to the other, “this neighborhood is growing so fast that if we gut rehab that building and get it zoned for retail on the first floor with work/live condos above it . . . where do we find co-investors to buy the property?” A few real estate businesses, such as FundRise, are already at work in this territory.

Crowdfunding is opportunistic, sometimes messy,  and not “monumental” or “world-changing” in the way the internal combustion engine or  polio vaccine was. It almost certainly won’t be used for financing anything as far-reaching as Amazon.com or as powerful as Google. Those types of businesses have little problem catching the eye of sophisticated angel and VC groups if they need outside investors.

Who has a list of the likely areas in which crowdfunding will take hold? Fire away.

 

Tagged: , , ,

Discussion

Comments are closed.